Sybille Lammes is the Second Confirmed Keynote Speaker for the PoCG 2017

sybille-lammesYesterday we informed you about the deadline extension for the Philosophy of Computer Games Conference 2017 (September the 4th, 11.59 PM GTM). This time, to further motivate you while you are working on your abstracts, we are happy to announce of the second of our keynote speakers – Sybille Lammes!

Sybille Lammes is professor New Media and Digital Culture at Leiden University.She has been a visiting Senior Research Fellow at The University of Manchester, and has worked as a researcher at the Centre for Interdisciplinary Methodologies at the University of Warwick, as well as the media-studies departments of Utrecht University and the University of Amsterdam. Her background is in media-studies and game-studies, which she has always approached from an interdisciplinary angle, including cultural studies, science and technology studies, postcolonial studies, and critical geography. She is co-editor of /Playful Identities /(2015), /Mapping Time /(2017 fc.) /The Routledge Handbook of Interdisciplinary Research Methods/ (2018 fc.). and /The Playful Citizen/ (2017 fc.). She is an ERC laureate and has been the PI of numerous research projects. She is a member of the Playful Mapping Collective.

Extended Deadline for PoCG 2017

philogames2017_fb_logoDue to numerous requests, we’ve decided to extend the abstracts submission deadline for the Philosophy of Computer Games Conference 2017 until Monday, September 4th (11:59 PM GMT). We hope that this additional time would help you to finish and polish your submissions. Just as a reminder: the abstracts should have a maximum 1000 words (maximum 700 words for the main text and 300 for the bibliography) and be submitted through review.gamephilosophy.org.

Mark Silcox is the First Confirmed Keynote Speaker for the PoCG 2017

Silcox, Mark DSC_1409 cWe are very happy to announce the first of our keynote speakers for the Philosophy of Computer Games 2017 – Mark Silcox! Using this opportunity, we would also like to remind you that we are waiting for your abstracts and workshop submissions till the 1st of September.

Mark Silcox was born and raised just outside of Toronto, Canada. He received his MA in Philosophy from the University of Toronto and his PhD from The Ohio State University. He is currently Professor and Chair of Humanities and Philosophy at the University of Central Oklahoma.

He has worked as a freelance writer in the video game industry, and was on the design teams for the Nintendo 64 Game Aidyn Chronicles: The First Mage and the MMORPG Earth & Beyond. He is a co-author (with Jon Cogburn) of Philosophy through Video Games (Routledge, 2008), and co-editor (with Jon Cogburn) of Raiding the Temple of Wisdom: Philosophy and Dungeons & Dragons (Open Court, 2012). His most recent publication in philosophy is an edited anthology of papers entitled Experience Machines: The Philosophy of Virtual Worlds (Rowman & Littlefield International, 2017). He is also the author of several works of interactive fiction, a couple of storytelling games,  and the SF novel The Face on the Mountain (Incandescent Phoenix, 2015).

Submission System for PCG2017 is Now Open

philogames2017_fb_logo

You can now upload your abstracts to Philosophy of Computer Games Conference  through review.gamephilosophy.org  If you have any questions or want to submit a workshop proposal, please feel free to contact us.

The abstracts should have a maximum 1000 words (maximum 700 words for the main text and 300 for the bibliography). The deadline for submissions is Midnight GMT, 01.09. 2017. All submitted abstracts will be subject to double blind peer review. Notification of accepted submissions will be sent out by 30.09 2017. Participation requires that a paper draft is submitted by 22.11, 2017 and will be made available on the conference website.

Reminder: Call for Papers for PCG2017 – Action in Computer Games

cfpphilogames2017justlogoAs September the 1st is approaching with big steps, and with it, the deadline for the Philosophy of Computer Games Conference 2017, we would like to send you a quick reminder. If you want, you can also visit our facebook event page or new website. In the near future you will find there all of the important information about accommodation in Kraków, conference venue and keynotes. You can also follow us on Twitter or – in case of any questions – write to us.

We are waiting for your abstracts and workshop proposals with anticipation!

Call for Papers for PCG2017:  

Action in Computer Games

We hereby invite scholars in any field of studies who take a professional interest in the philosophy of computer games to submit papers to the 11th International Conference on the Philosophy of Computer Games, to be held in Kraków, Poland, November 29-December 1, 2017. The notion of action connects central topics in the study of games to philosophical problems such as questions of will, intentionality and the autonomy of an agent. For this conference, we invite papers that explore ethical, experiential, aesthetic and ontological aspects of acting in a computer game. Problem of action in games can be approached from several perspectives and analyzed through different research questions. A few examples of such perspectives/questions are:

Structure of action
What is the ontological status of interactive works?
What is the ecological structure of a computer game?
How are actionable structures signified in a game?

Real, virtual, and fictional actions
Are there real and fictional aspects of a game act, and how we distinguish between them?
What is a virtual action?
How can meaning in games be created via passivity or idleness?

Norms and rules
How do ethical or social norms apply to the game acts?
How and to what extent are player actions prescribed or prohibited by gameplay norms?

How do players act?
What kinds of motivations serve to define typical player actions?
What characterizes the existential situation of a player?
How are play actions experienced?
What significance does the concept of agency have in the player’s experience?

In-game agency
What does it mean to act via an avatar?
What is the character of in-game embodiment?
Is the avatar truly an agent?
To what extent can the game itself be considered an agent?

The papers should present original (i.e. not published or presented elsewhere) research. Accepted papers will have a clear focus on philosophy and philosophical issues in relation to computer games. They will refer to specific examples from computer games rather than merely invoke them in general terms.

In addition to papers that are directed at the main theme we invite a smaller number of papers in an “open” category. We are especially interested in papers that aim to continue discussions from earlier conferences in this series.

The abstracts should have a maximum 1000 words (maximum 700 words for the main text and 300 for the bibliography). The deadline for submissions is Midnight GMT, 01.09. 2017. 
Please submit your abstract through review.gamephilosophy.org. All submitted abstracts will be subject to double blind peer review. Notification of accepted submissions will be sent out by 30.09 2017. Participation requires that 
a paper draft is submitted by 22.11, 2017 and will be made available on the conference website.

We also issue a call for workshops or panels to be held on November 28. Please submit a short proposal to the program committee chair by 01.09.2017 if you are interested in organizing an event.

Journal Article: “On Game Definitions”

Dear Colleagues,

I would humbly like to draw your attention to a new article, “On game definitions,” written by myself, and published in the Journal of the Philosophy of Sport. Although the focus is on games in general, and not on videogames in particular, it does relate to extant discussions of game definitions in the game studies literature, and could therefore perhaps be of some interest to the members of this community.

The article defends a Wittgensteinian approach to game definitions. It also adopts a pragmatic argumentative view of definitions which treats all definitions as implicit arguments in support of particular points of view on how to classify reality. Definitions do not reveal the “essence of gameness”; instead they are argumentative tools for influencing the linguistic habits of a given community. It is argued that definitions should not be evaluated in terms of their truth or falsity, but in terms of their adequacy and acceptability. To this end, a set of pragmatic evaluation criteria are proposed. Finally, the costs and benefits of adopting this particular approach to definitions are also weighed.

Book: Experience Machines – The Philosophy of Virtual Worlds

5855043af5ba74113c8a1ef1Mark Silcox is publishing an edited book with contributions that relate to Nozick’s experience machine argument as applied to virtual worlds. The book is highly relevant to the philosophy of computer games, and it has contributions from several members of the Game Philosophy Network. The ToC is available in the preview on the publishers site.   From the description:

“In his classic work Anarchy, State and Utopia, Robert Nozick asked his readers to imagine being permanently plugged into a ‘machine that would give you any experience you desired’. He speculated that, in spite of the many obvious attractions of such a prospect, most people would choose against passing the rest of their lives under the influence of this type of invention. Nozick thought (and many have since agreed) that this simple thought experiment had profound implications for how we think about ethics, political justice, and the significance of technology in our everyday lives. 

Nozick’s argument was made in 1974, about a decade before the personal computer revolution in Europe and North America. Since then, opportunities for the citizens of industrialized societies to experience virtual worlds and simulated environments have multiplied to an extent that no philosopher could have predicted. The authors in this volume re-evaluate the merits of Nozick’s argument, and use it as a jumping–off point for the philosophical examination of subsequent developments in culture and technology, including a variety of experience-altering cybernetic technologies such as computer games, social media networks, HCI devices, and neuro-prostheses.”

Journal of the Philosophy of Games is Open for General Submissions

greencover3onlinefirstcoverminimizedWe now open Journal of the Philosophy of Games (JPG) for general submissions, and welcome philosophers, game theorists and scholars in other fields of studies to submit papers for the regular issues.

JPG explores philosophical questions about the general nature of games and gameplay and about their interrelation with technology, art, communication and social interaction. More information about the submissions and the author guidelines is found at the journal website.

We welcome submissions of regular articles, discussion notes and book reviews. Please contact the editorial board to ascertain that a book review will fit the journal profile.

Submissions may be submitted via the submission system on the journal website, and will receive double-blind peer review from renowned scholars in philosophy and game studies.

The Journal of the Philosophy of Games (JPG) is now publishing the first manuscripts in our “Online First Issue“, which will be converted into a regular issue by the end of the year.

We aim to have the papers indexed in the major relevant library indexing databases.

JPG is an open-access publication hosted by the University of Oslo, Norway.

“Online First Issue” of Journal of the Philosophy of Games

greencover3onlinefirstcoverminimizedJournal of the Philosophy of Games now has its first publications available in the Online First Issue. We will publish the accepted papers as they become available in this issue, which will be converted to one or two regular issues by the end of the year.

Our first article is titled “The Incompatibility of Games and Artworks” and is written by Brock Rough. The paper is utilizing a definition of games derived from Bernard Suits to argue that for an artist to intend something as a game is to intend essential constitutive conditions that precludes it from being both a game and an artwork.

We also publish a book review of Stefano Gualeni’s book “Virtual Worlds as Philosophical Tools” written by Jonne Arjonta. Gualeni’s book explores the topic of how computer games can be used for philosophical reflection. Arjonta provides an overview of its main points of discussion as well as critical notes on its approach to the topic.

Call for Papers for PCG2017: Action in Computer Games

krakowWe hereby invite scholars in any field of studies who take a professional interest in the philosophy of computer games to submit papers to the 11th International Conference on the Philosophy of Computer Games, to be held in Kraków, Poland, November 29-December 1, 2017. The notion of action connects central topics in the study of games to philosophical problems such as questions of will, intentionality and the autonomy of an agent. For this conference, we invite papers that explore ethical, experiential, aesthetic and ontological aspects of acting in a computer game. Problem of action in games can be approached from several perspectives and analyzed through different research questions. A few examples of such perspectives/questions are:

Structure of action
What is the ontological status of interactive works?
What is the ecological structure of a computer game?
How are actionable structures signified in a game?

Real, virtual, and fictional actions
Are there real and fictional aspects of a game act, and how we distinguish between them?
What is a virtual action?
How can meaning in games be created via passivity or idleness?

Norms and rules
How do ethical or social norms apply to the game acts?
How and to what extent are player actions prescribed or prohibited by gameplay norms?

How do players act?
What kinds of motivations serve to define typical player actions?
What characterizes the existential situation of a player?
How are play actions experienced?
What significance does the concept of agency have in the player’s experience?

In-game agency
What does it mean to act via an avatar?
What is the character of in-game embodiment?
Is the avatar truly an agent?
To what extent can the game itself be considered an agent?

The papers should present original (i.e. not published or presented elsewhere) research. Accepted papers will have a clear focus on philosophy and philosophical issues in relation to computer games. They will refer to specific examples from computer games rather than merely invoke them in general terms.

In addition to papers that are directed at the main theme we invite a smaller number of papers in an “open” category. We are especially interested in papers that aim to continue discussions from earlier conferences in this series.

The abstracts should have a maximum 1000 words (maximum 700 words for the main text and 300 for the bibliography). The deadline for submissions is Midnight GMT, 01.09. 2017. 
Please submit your abstract through review.gamephilosophy.org. All submitted abstracts will be subject to double blind peer review. Notification of accepted submissions will be sent out by 30.09 2017. Participation requires that 
a paper draft is submitted by 22.11, 2017 and will be made available on the conference website.

We also issue a call for workshops or panels to be held on November 28. Please submit a short proposal to the program committee chair by 01.09.2017 if you are interested in organizing an event.

For information about the conference please visit 2017.gamephilosophy.org and gamephilosophy.org.